Crops

CROP SCENE INVESTIGATION – 34: What happened to Karl’s corn planter?

by BERNARD TOBIN

With the challenging planting conditions of spring 2011, Pioneer Hi-Bred agronomist Scott Fife knew it would only be a matter of time before he received his first call from a grower asking him for help with some strange happenings in a newly planted field.

Fife’s first call to investigate came in late June from Karl, a Glengarry County farmer, who was trying to understand why his corn field featured an odd pattern – five short rows followed by one taller, knee-high row – that was repeated across the entire field.

Growers see a promising future for canola in Ontario

Though it lags far behind soybeans and corn, acreage has more than quadrupled since 2006, yields are improving and it fits well with crop rotation

by MARY BAXTER

For Mike Schill, there’s nothing new about adding canola into the crop rotation. The spike-leaved, yellow-flowered plant occupies about 35 per cent of the roughly 5,000 acres he farms with his father and brother near Arthur in Wellington County. “My father started growing it in the mid-1980s,” says Schill.

Dow AgroSciences wins a partial victory on 2,4-D

As the result of a legal settlement, Quebec agrees that the herbicide doesn’t pose unacceptable risks, provided label instructions are followed. But cosmetic bans on its use may still continue


by SUSAN MANN

Quebec can keep its ban on non-crop uses of 2,4-D, but it had to drop a controversial description of the product as dangerous as a result of the settlement of a legal challenge by the herbicide’s manufacturer.

Make your crop residue an opportunity, not a problem

That’s the philosophy at VanMeer Farms, in Tillsonburg, where using residue to control erosion and give back nutrients to the soil is routine practice

by TONY BALKWILL
 

When you enter the office of George Vermeersch and his sons, Greg and Jeff, of VanMeer Farms, Tillsonburg, you will notice a key feature: a whiteboard displaying different tillage tool headings and fields specifically labelled to require a certain tillage pass based on cropping history, harvest and previous tillage.

CSI AGRONOMY Crop Scene Investigation – 33: Which pest invaded Jeffrey’s corn field? – Solved

About one-third of the larvae in Jeffrey’s field were not western bean cutworm. These pests had yellow and greenish bodies, a tan-coloured head and distinctive black dots along their body.

by BERNARD TOBIN

Jeffrey had assumed that all the pests chewing on his corn were western bean cutworm (WBC). But on closer examination, about one-third of the larvae were actually corn earworm (CE). Feeding patterns of the two pests are similar.

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