Pigeon King breeders turn to squab markets

© AgMedia Inc.

STRATFORD - With no market for their once lucrative breeding stock, a good number of Ontario’s Pigeon King International breeders are planning to sell offspring into the meat market, says former Embro-based salesman Ken Wagler.

UPDATED Thursday June 26, 2008, 11:54 a.m. (Links added)

Comments

"'Sicilian style' squab sells for $125 a plate at a restaurant in Montreal."

-- As someone else mentioned, this is pie in the sky. Squab for fine dining are not bred from the sort of birds PKI was selling.

Wagler says you raise a meat bird to 20 weeks. Squab are 4 weeks old .

I hope no one actually ate any of the birds that were processed that day without knowing whether the PKI flocks were on medicated feed.

Everyone keeps talking about a market and an industry. What market? What industry? Pie in the sky!!

I hope that there can be some similar process to take place for us in the states, who also got left holdign the bag. My investment was small compared to many, but it was mine.

Teresa
Virginia, USA

Where does a person start? My father got involved earlier this year. He has new pigeons everyday and no one to buy them. And if Iowa was the first state to say this man couldn't sell these birds in Iowa, how did he. Where does a person start. Attorney General of the state? Other farmers going thru the same situation? Where. Help!

Add new comment

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
To prevent automated spam submissions leave this field empty.
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.
We welcome thoughtful comments and ideas. Comments must be on topic. Cheap shots, unsubstantiated allegations, anonymous attacks or negativity directed against people and organizations will not be published. Comments are modified or deleted at the discretion of the editors. If you wish to be identified by name, which will give your opinion far more weight and provide a far greater chance of being published, leave a telephone number so that identity can be confirmed. The number will not be published.

© AgMedia Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.